First Batch of 8 Apache AH-64E Helicopters Inducted Into Indian Air Force at Pathankot Airbase, Choppers Get Cannon Salute

The Indian Air Force (IAF) on Tuesday inducted eight Apache Ah-64E attack helicopters during a glittering ceremont held at Pathankot airbase. IAF chief Air Chief Marshal BS Dhanoa was the chief guest of the event. The newly inducted helicopters received water cannon salute. In 2015, the Indian government had signed a deal with the United States (US) and Boeing to procure 22 Apache helicopters.The choppers will inducted into the IAF in a phased manner. All the 22 chopper will be delivered to the IAF by 2020. The helicopters landed at the Hindan airbase on July 28.

Indian Air Frce’s Tweet:

Air Chief Marshal BS Dhanoa during the induction ceremony said “Apache attack helicopters are being purchased to replace the Mi-35 fleet. Alongside the capability to shoot fire and forget anti tank guided missiles, air to air missiles, rockets and other ammunitions, it also has modern EW capabilities to provide versatility to helicopter in a network centric aerial warfare.” IAF Gets First Apache Helicopter During Ceremony Held at Boeing’s Production Facility in United States’ Arizona; Watch Video.

Cannon Salute to Apache Helicopters:

Air Chief Marshal Dhanoa further added, “Apaches have been an integral part of numerous historic campaigns worldwide. These aircraft have been modified specifically to suit the exacting standards demanded by IAF. I am happy to note that the delivery schedule is on time with eight helicopters already being delivered.”

India is the 16th nation including Taiwan which to have Apache attack helicopters in service. The Boeing AH-64 Apache is an American twin-turboshaft attack helicopter with a tailwheel-type landing gear arrangement and a tandem cockpit for a crew of two. It features a nose-mounted sensor suite for target acquisition and night vision systems. The helicopter was introduced to U.S. Army service in April 1986.

(Picture Courtesy: Twitter/Doordarshan)

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First Batch of 4 Apache AH-64E Attack Helicopters For IAF Arrived At Hindan Air Base

The United States aerospace major Boeing on Saturday handed over the the first four of the 22 Apache attack helicopters to the Indian Air Force (IAF) at the Hindan air base in Ghaziabad. According to reports, four more Apache AH-64 choppers will reach Indian next week. All these eight chopper will be stationed at Pathankot Air Force Station where they will be stationed permanently. Indian Air Force Soon to Get Boeing’s Apache And Chinook Helicopters.

The first batch of attach helicopters were delivered to the IAF almost four years after India signed a deal to procure 22 Apache AH-64E helicopters. Boeing handed the first AH-64E (I) – Apache Guardian helicopter to the IAF in Mesa of USA’s Arizona in May. Earlier this month two new heavy-lift Chinook helicopters for the IAF arrived at the Mundra port.

New Delhi signed a $ 3 billion deal to buy 22 Apache and 15 Chinook helicopters in September 2015 with Boeing and the government of the United States. The Indian government signed a direct contract with the Boeing to procure Chinook helicopters, while the deal to buy Apache helicopters is a mixed one. IAF Gets First Apache Helicopter During Ceremony Held at Boeing’s Production Facility in United States’ Arizona; Watch Video.

A part of the deal was signed with the US aviation company and the other half is signed with the US government under foreign military sales route. Meanwhile, in 2017, the National Democratic Alliance (NDA) government signed another deal with the Boeing to acquire six Apache helicopters for the Indian Army. It will be the first fleet of attack helicopters of the army.

The Boeing AH-64 Apache is an American twin-turboshaft attack helicopter with a tailwheel-type landing gear arrangement and a tandem cockpit for a crew of two. It features a nose-mounted sensor suite for target acquisition and night vision systems. The helicopter was introduced to U.S. Army service in April 1986.

(Picture Courtesy: Twitter/Ken Juster)