Defence Acquisition Council Approves Indian Army’s Request to Procure 5,000 Milan 2T Missiles, Also Gives Nod to Rs 4,000 Crore Project to Construct 6 Submarines

The Defence Acquisition Council on Thursday approved the procurement of 5,000 French-made Milan 2T missiles. The meeting was headed by Defence Minister Nirmala Sitharaman. Three services chief were also present in the meeting. the Indian Army had requested to procure second-generation missiles, Milan 2T missiles as India till now have not approved Israeli made anti-tank missile ‘Spike’ and Defence Research and Development Organisation’s (DRDO) Nag missile is still under trials. Indian Army Seeking 5,000 Anti-Tank Guided Missiles ‘MILAN 2T’ to Fulfil Immediate Shortage; DAC To Take Decision on January 31.

Milan 2T is an advanced variant of MILAN missiles which India used in the Kargil War of 1999 to destroy the bunkers built by Pakistani soldiers in the mountains. MILAN is a wire-guided missile. The purchase of MILAN 2T missiles will also fulfil the immediate need of anti-tank missiles and these missiles could also serve for another decade. It has a range of over 2 kilometres. Currently, the Indian Army has a requirement of 70,000 anti-tank guided missiles and 850 launchers. India tests NAG 190, $500 Million Spike Missile deal in jeopardy.

Apart from the Milan 2T Missiles, The DAC also approved the project to construct six submarines. The total cost of the project will be Rs 40,000 crores. Meanwhile, on Wednesday, the Indian government signed a contract with Goa Shipyard Ltd, Goa to-date for the construction of two naval frigates. The contract was part of an Inter-Governmental Agreement (IGA) between the Government of Republic of India and Government of Russian Federation which was concluded on 15 October 2016. As part of the IGA, India signed a deal with Russia in October to directly purchase two project 1135.6 class frigates, while another deal was signed to build two other frigates at Goa Shipyard Ltd.

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Indian Government Signs Contract with Goa Shipyard Ltd For Construction of Two ‘Project 1135.6’ Frigates For Indian Navy

The Indian government on Wednesday signed a contract with Goa Shipyard Ltd, Goa to-date for the construction of two naval frigates. The contract was part of an Inter-Governmental Agreement (IGA) between the Government of Republic of India and Government of Russian Federation which was concluded on 15 October 2016, for construction of additional Project 1135.6 Follow-on ships in India, at M/s Goa Shipyard Limited (GSL). According to the contract, the ships are scheduled for delivery in June 2026 and December 2026 to the Indian Navy respectively. Indian Navy Inducts Third Ship of LCU Mk-IV Class at Port Blair.

The $500 million deal to construct two stealth frigates in Goa was signed in November last year with Russia. The deal came just weeks after the two countries inked a $950 million deal to import two other such warships from Russia. The Follow-on P 1135.6 series of frigates, customised to meet the Indian Navy’s specific requirements, are potent platforms, with a mission span covering the entire spectrum of Naval warfare; Air, Surface and Sub-surface. INS Tarangini Returns to Kochi After Seven-Month Long Sailing; Rear Admiral RJ Nadkarni Receives The Ship.

The ships would be equipped to operate in littoral and blue waters; both as a single unit and as consorts of a naval task force. Advanced features of stealth include a special hull design, to limit radar cross-section, low electromagnetic, infrared and under water noise signatures. The ships would carry highly sophisticated and state-of-art weapon systems and sensors. To support these ships through their life cycle, the Indian Navy has put in place requisite infrastructures for training and maintenance. Indian Army Seeking 5,000 Anti-Tank Guided Missiles ‘MILAN 2T’ to Fulfil Immediate Shortage; DAC To Take Decision on January 31.

Importantly, in line with the Government’s ‘Make in India’ initiative, these ships being constructed at M/s GSL, Goa under Russian assistance, would make these platforms the largest number of ships of a class in service showcasing indigenous equipment such as sonar system, Brahmos missile system, Combat Management System etc. The Indian-made warships are likely to cost 30-50% more than the other two ships. India already operates six of the Talwar-class frigates.